Atomic and molecular physics
15 Jul 2019
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​Artemis has two experimental chambers for studies of gas-phase atomic and molecular targets: the AMO end-station, and a chamber for liquid-phase studies equipped with a liquid micro-jet.

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​​​​​​Ion (left) and electron (right) velocity map images of nitrogen

 

AMO end-station 

The atomic and molecular physics (AMO) ​end-station has been designed for experiments on gas targets, particularly UV-pump XUV-probe photoelectron spectroscopy, which we have now successfully demonstrated  [e.g. Smith, Phys Rev Lett 120 183003 (2018)].

The end-station also been used for time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with UV-pump and 400 nm probe [Horke, Phys Rev Lett 117 163002 (2016)Smith, Phys Chem Chem Phys 18  28150 (2016)​]  and Coulomb explosion imaging of clusters [Galin​is, Phys Rev Lett 113 043004 (2014)] (link opens in a new window)

The interaction station consists of two coupled chambers. The upper chamber can be configured with either a velocity-map imaging (VMI) detector for ions and electrons, or an electron time-of-flight spectrometer (Kaesdorf ETF11). The VMI can be run with voltages of up to 15 kV applied to the plates, and we are able to image electrons with energies up to 200 eV. The detector is a two-stage imaging MCP with phosphor and CCD camera. 

The lower chamber is pumped by two 3200 litres/sec turbo pumps. We can connect the chambers in two ways: with a skimmer for differential pumping and the gas source in the lower chamber; or with chambers connected and the gas source close to the interaction region. Available gas sources include CW nozzles and kHz pulsed valves, with capability for flowing carrier gas over liquid samples or for gas mixing.

​Liquid jet chamber

The chamber for liquid-phase studies is equipped with a liquid micro-​jet (Microliquids GmbH), and a differentially pumped time-of-flight detector can be provided. The design is based on a chamber developed by EPFL's Laboratory of Ultrafast Spectroscopy (link opens in a new window) and tested at Artemis [Arrell, Rev Sci Inst 85 103117 (2014)] (link opens in a new window).​

Contact: Chapman, Richard (STFC,RAL,CLF)